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Varonis Data Apocalypse

8 tips to surviving the data security apocalypse

By Varonis

These days, working in data security can feel like surviving a zombie apocalypse – mindless hordes of bots and keyloggers are endlessly attempting to find something to consume. Just like in “The Walking Dead,” these zombies are an ancillary threat to other humans. The bots and keyloggers are pretty easy to defeat: it’s the human hackers that are the real threat.

How prepared are you to deal with the real threats out there?

Get Global Access Groups Under Control

Are you still using global access groups? That’s the dystopian equivalent of leaving your walls unmanned!  Giving the default “everyone” group access to anything is a hacker’s dream scenario.  They get a free pass to move from share to share, looking for anything and everything, and you’ll never know they were there.

Removing all permissions from the default global access groups is an easy way to improve data security. Varonis DatAdvantage highlights folders with Global Access Groups so that you can see who’s got access to what at-a-glance – and then you can use the Automation Engine to quickly remove those global permissions from your shares.  All you need to do is set the Automation Engine to remove Global Access Groups and it will move users out of those generic groups and into a new group that you can then modify.  The important thing is to stop using Global Access Groups, and keep your walls manned at all times!

Identify (and Lock Down) Your Sensitive Data

Effective survivors hide their resources and food stores from the prying eyes of outsiders. The most organized groups stash backup caches and keep records of their stores. Do you do the same with your PII and intellectual property data?  Can you, right now, tell me where every social security number or credit card string is stored on your file shares? If you can’t, then who knows what kind of treasures potential thieves will find as they poke around?

Knowing where your sensitive data is stored is vital to surviving the data security apocalypse – our Data Classification Framework quickly and easily identifies PII and intellectual property data in your unstructured files, so you know where your sensitive data is – and where you can lock it down.

Track Your Dangerous Data

Imagine that the guard on the North wall got eaten – and now the map with the weapons caches for the entire region is MIA.  Can another group of survivors find that map and steal your stuff? You might be leaving the same breadcrumbs on your network by leaving behind old files that have valuable information a hacker could use for profit.

Identifying and deleting or archiving this data is just as important as moving that cache of weapons to the safety of your base camp. DatAdvantage can report on stale data and give you visibility into what might be leaving you vulnerable to hackers. Managing stale data is an excellent strategy to limit exposure, and keeps you one step ahead.

Practice Good Password and Account Policy

Say you use a certain whistle to communicate with your group – and you’ve used that same whistle for the past 8 months. What are the chances that a rival group will ambush you by using that whistle?

It’s the same if you have passwords that never change, or accounts that are no longer active, which should have been removed or deactivated.  Hackers can use those accounts to try to access resources over and over again without setting off any alarms.

It’s always best to change the “whistle,” or password, on a consistent basis – and have a policy in place to revoke access privileges when people leave the group. Perhaps something less drastic than chopping their head off before they go full zombie.  With DatAdvantage, you can report on these kinds of accounts in your Active Directory so that you can take action and remove this threat without using an axe.

Fix Inconsistent Permissions

Once you have redundancies and processes to keep everything running smoothly, what happens when that one guy in your survivor group just can’t follow simple instructions?  What if they’re an important part of the plan, but can never quite complete their part?  You might say that part of the plan is broken, like when you have a share that is set to inherit permissions from the parent – but for some reason isn’t. In data security terms, you have inconsistent permissions, which can cause confusion as to exactly how the permissions on these folders are set.

Fixing all of these broken links in the fence will help keep the outsiders from getting into your data stores. You can automate the process of repairing inconsistent permissions with the Automation Engine – so that you’re maintaining a least privilege model and only the right people can access that data. Or get through that fence.

Identify Data Owners

If your survival group is going to be a self-sustaining society, you’ll need leaders to support your growth.  You wouldn’t want the horticulturist in charge of weapons, and you probably wouldn’t want the weapons master in charge of your vegetables.  The same holds true for your data and the data owners.

You need to be able to identify the owners of your data so that you know who’s responsible for managing permissions and access to those shares. When there’s one person in the Legal department who can grant access to the legal shares, you’re in a much better situation than if the IT department handles that for every department.

The first step is to identify data owners – and DatAdvantage provides reports and statistics to help you do just that. You can automate the process with DataPrivilege, and enable those data owners to approve and revoke permissions from their shares and audit permissions on their shares on a regular basis. Now that the data owners are in charge of who gets access to their data, things are starting to make a lot more sense – not to mention run much more smoothly.

Monitor File Activity and User Behavior

As your society of survivors grows into a full-fledged community, you want to make sure that everyone is contributing and utilizing the resources of the community correctly.  So you put in some monitoring systems.  Assign chain of commands and reporting structures and even make some rules.

And so, you need to do the same thing by monitoring your file and email servers. DatAdvantage gives you visibility on the file and email servers – even user behavior – which is paramount to data security: outsiders can sometimes get in, and once they get in they might look like they belong.  But when they start stealing extra bread or copying gigs of data to an external drive, we need to know.

Set Up Alerts and Defend Your Data

Alerts can warn you about a herd tripping a bell on the perimeter or that Jeff from marketing has started encrypting the file server with ransomware.  The faster and more that you know about potential threats, the better you can respond.  Conversely, the longer the outsiders have to do bad things, the worse it will be for us every time.

You can set those tripwires to automatically respond to specific types of threats with DatAlert, so that your security team can lessen the impact and get straight to the investigation phase. DatAlert establishes behavioral baselines for every user – so that you know when somebody’s acting out of the ordinary, or if their account has been hijacked. With DatAlert, you can monitor your sensitive data for unusual activity and flag suspicious user behavior so that you know when you’re under attack.

Want to check your own preparedness level for the data security apocalypse? Get a risk assessment to see how you measure up.  We’ll  check your environment for all of these potential threats and provide a plan of action to get you up to true survivor status.


Managed detection and response market worth $1.6bn by 2022

The major forces driving the growth of the Managed Detection and Response Market include the increase in the enterprise targeted cyber-attacks, shortage of cybersecurity practitioners, and need for compliance to various government regulations.

That’s according to a new report from MarketsAndMarkets, which predicts the market size is expected will grow from $419.7 million in 2017 to $1,658 million by 2022, equivalent to a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 31.6% during the forecast period.

Moreover, the report says technological advancement and increasing adoption of technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT) across various end-use applications are some of the other factors that are driving the market growth.

The endpoint security type segment is expected to hold the largest market share in the Managed Detection and Response Market during the forecast period.

Endpoints are usually network devices, such as servers, desktops, laptops, smartphones, tablets, and Point of Sale (POS) connected remotely to an enterprise server, making them vulnerable and creating an entry point for potential cyber threats.

Endpoint security type MDR services provide real-time control, visibility, and analytics of endpoints deployed across an organisation. Vendors are offering advanced endpoint MDR services that leverage technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning, to proactively detect attacks, malicious activities, and respond to them before they undesirably affect the enterprises’ business operations.

The cloud security type segment is expected to gain traction and grow at the highest CAGR, owing to the rising adoption of cloud computing across enterprises of different sizes and the increasing security vulnerabilities arising out of it.


Uber conceal massive data hack

Global transportation tech company Uber concealed a massive breach of personal information of over 57 million customers and drivers in October 2016, with the company acknowledging that it failed to notify individuals and regulators it has been revealed.

The company covered up the breach, and instead paid the hackers responsible $100,000 to delete data and keep the breach quiet.

Addressing the situation, new CEO Dara Khosrowshahi admitted that, while there was no excuse for the incident, he had “obtained assurances that the downloaded data had been destroyed”.

“None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it,” Uber’s chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, said in a statement to The Guardian: “While I can’t erase the past, I can commit on behalf of every Uber employee that we will learn from our mistakes.

“We are changing the way we do business, putting integrity at the core of every decision we make and working hard to earn the trust of our customers.”

It is thought the hackers managed to download data including names, email addresses and phone numbers, including driver license numbers of over 600,000 Uber drivers around the US.

Uber claims that other information, including credit card numbers, bank account details and birth dates were not compromised.

Khosrowshahi admitted that the breach had prompted him to take several measures, with the departure of two senior members of staff responsible fro the company’s 2016 response.





Employees are companies’ biggest data security risk

A consensus study commissioned by data security specialist HANDD Business Solutions (HANDD) has revealed that nearly a quarter of IT professionals believe that the behaviour of employees and their reactions to social engineering attacks – which can trick them into sharing user credentials and sensitive data – poses a big challenge to data security.

The survey of 304 IT professionals in the UK shows that 21 per cent of respondents say regulations, legislation and compliance will be one of the two greatest business challenges to impact data security. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is causing real concern among professionals in their bid to be compliant by the deadline, which is less than 12 months away. GDPR will not only raise the privacy bar for companies across the EU, but will also impose extra data protection burdens on them.

HANDD CEO and co-founder Ian Davin commented: “Companies must change their mindset and look at data, not as a fungible commodity, but as a valuable asset. Data is more valuable than a pot of gold, which puts companies in a challenging position as the stewards of that data. C-suite executives must understand the data protection challenges they face and implement a considered plan and methodical approach to protecting sensitive data.”

41 per cent of those surveyed assign the same level of security resources and spend for all company data, regardless of its importance. Analysing and documenting the characteristics of each data item is a vital part of its journey through an organisation. A robust data classification system will see all data tagged with markers defining useful attributes, such as sensitivity level or a retention requirement and ensuring that an organisation understands completely which data requires greater levels of protection.

“Employees are probably your biggest asset, yet they are also your weakest link, and so raising user awareness and improving security consciousness are hugely important for companies that want to drive a culture of security throughout their organisation,” commented Danny Maher, CTO at HANDD.